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University of Oregon

Winter 2016

ENG 104               Introduction to Literature: Fiction                                                                                                             

5  Sections

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a specific period or national tradition, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak intelligently about fiction. The course addresses basic questions about the nature of prose narrative and the interrelated activities of reading, writing, and interpretation. What is a story, and what role do stories play in our cultural and political lives? Is interpretation of a literary text a purely subjective process, or are some interpretations more valid than others? Narrative technique, point of view, and character development are some of the terms and concepts examined in the course, though each instructor will bring his or her own analytical framework to the class. Weekly readings of short stories and novels are substantial in scope and difficulty, and students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages. As a basic introduction to a major genre in the field of literary studies, this course satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category. It is not recommended for English Majors, who are encouraged to enroll in the department’s more historically oriented and comprehensive Introduction to the English Major sequence, ENG 220-222.
Gen Ed

 

ENG 106               Introduction to Literature: Poetry                                                                                                                

2 sections

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis of poems by major writers, students will be challenged to explain not only what a given poem might mean to its readers, but also how a poem communicates meaning differently than a work of fiction, drama, or some other mode of literary expression. ENG 106 is not a comprehensive introduction to the traditions of English and American poetry; it is, rather, a series of intensive exercises designed to equip students with the analytical tools needed to read, discuss, and write about poetry effectively. Weekly readings are relatively short but extremely demanding, and students will do a substantial amount of critical writing, including formal essays totaling at least 8-10 pages. As a basic introduction a major genre in the field of literary studies, this course satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category. It is not recommended for English Majors, who are encouraged to enroll in the department’s more historically oriented and comprehensive Introduction to the English Major sequence, ENG 220-222.
Gen Ed

 

ENG 108               World Literature                                                                                                                                                               

TBA

This is one of three courses that form a three-part chronological survey of international trends in literature from its archaic and classical origins to the present. These courses can be taken as a yearlong sequence, or they can be taken individually. All works are read in English translation. There are no prerequisites, and no background knowledge of international literary history is expected. All three courses seek to give students a truly global sense of literary history by incorporating works in various genres from Asia, the Near East, Africa, Latin America, Europe, North America, and elsewhere. ENG 107 begins with the archaic period and ends with the late Middle Ages in Europe. ENG 108 spans the period from the European Renaissance to the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution, focusing on cultural relations between the Near East and Europe. ENG 109 covers the 19th and 20th centuries, with emphasis on the emergence of global cultural movements such as Romanticism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism. All three courses seek to juxtapose Western and non- Western readings, challenging students to locate “classic” literary works within a global perspective. Weekly readings of short stories and novels are substantial in scope and difficulty, and students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages. With their comparative focus on various literary traditions, all three courses satisfy the University Multicultural Requirement in the International Cultures category. In offering students a broad introduction to college-level literary studies, ENG 107, 108, and 109 also satisfy the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.
Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 

ENG 110               Introduction to Film and Media                                                                                                                                               

TBA

Basic critical approaches to film and media studies. Analysis and interpretation of film and media.
Gen Ed; Elective

 

 

ENG 199               Introduction to Queer Literature

Pearl Brilmyer

What does it mean to call oneself gay? lesbian? homosexual? queer? Where did these words come from, and how do their differing meanings reflect a history of changing conceptions of gay and lesbian culture? How does language—and literature specifically—shape sexuality and sexual politics? This course will take a historical approach to the study of gay and lesbian literature and culture. It will consider how shifting definitions of homosexuality, under different guises and different terms, have shaped our understanding of what it means to be LGBTQ today.
Elective

 

ENG 199               Special Studies: Grow up Already; Teenage Life in Literature & Film

Gershow, Miriam

This course focuses on close analysis of contemporary literature and film made for adults, but concerned primarily with the teenage experience. We examine why the teenage years serve as a preoccupation for so many authors and auteurs and what these depictions tell us about not only the culture’s view of adolescence but also of itself, as a whole.
 Elective 

 

ENG 199               True Fictions

Brendan O’Kelly

Ever since The Blair Witch Project (1999) was marketed at “found footage” documenting the last few days of missing–and presumably dead–film students, the horror genre has been dominated by an endless barrage of films pretending to be discovered footage of actual events. These films are so popular that the “found footage” style now appears in a wide range of genres, from cop movies to science-fiction and even romantic comedies. Why are people today so obsessed with fiction that pretends to be real? While the “found footage” trend is now at the height of its popularity, fiction posing as truth is nothing new. This course will trace the development of such fiction, whether written or filmed, from its prominence in 19th century prose to documentary-styled novels, films, and radio programs that span the 20th century. We will conclude with an extended examination of the predominance of “found footage” films in the new millennium that arguably parallel the rise of reality television, YouTube, and the camera phone.
Elective

 

ENG 200               Public Speaking as a Liberal Art                                                                                                         

Horton, Kathleen

Study and practice of public speaking as grounded in the five rhetorical canons of invention, arrangement, style, delivery and memory.
Elective

 

ENG 207               Shakespeare                                                                                                                                     

TBA

Students read, discuss, and critique Shakespeare’s early comedies and tragedies. Plays covered generally include (but are not limited to) A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV (Part One), Richard II, Henry V, Julius Caesar, and Hamlet. Weekly readings and occasional screenings of plays demand a considerable investment of time and effort, in addition to which students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages. The course introduces students to central questions in the study of dramatic art, as well as to issues pertaining more broadly to the study of literature in English. Students will leave the course having read extensively from the works of one of the major writers of the western tradition, and they will have acquired interpretive, analytical, and communication skills that will aid them in their future coursework in English and other disciplines. ENG 207 satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.
Gen Ed; Shakespeare

 

ENG 208               Shakespeare 

2 sections

 Students read, discuss, and critique Shakespeare’s later comedies and tragedies. Plays covered in ENG 208 generally include (but are not limited to) Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth, Anthony and Cleopatra, The Tempest, and Othello. Weekly readings and occasional screenings of plays demand a considerable investment of time and effort, in addition to which students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages. The course introduces students to central questions in the study of dramatic art, as well as to issues pertaining more broadly to the study of literature in English. Students will leave the course having read extensively from the works of one of the major writers of the western tradition, and they will have acquired interpretive, analytical, and communication skills that will aid them in their future coursework in English and other disciplines. ENG 208 satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.
Gen Ed; Shakespeare

 

ENG 211                               Survey of English Literature                                                                                       

TBA

This is a survey of prominent works of English literature (mainly poems, with a few excursions into novels, short stories, and critical essays) from the end of the eighteenth century to the present day.  In this course, we will consider topics such as shifts in the hierarchy of genres, debates over whether art is meant to imitate or re-imagine the world, the place of religious faith in a rapidly changing society, women’s complex role as both the passive subjects and the active creators of literature, and formal developments in prose and poetry that continue to be important for writers today.  Tracing significant currents of thought through literary history, we’ll also think about periodization.  What distinguishes the Romantic era from the Victorian era from the Modern era?  To what extent are these useful distinctions?  As we become familiar with the literary past and with the events that shaped it, we will build a sophisticated critical vocabulary and hone our skills as attentive readers.  Above all, we’ll focus on the ways in which the nuances of language and form inevitably shape the meaning of a text:  how do stanzaic patterns, rhymes and rhythms, and the use of metaphor determine the emotional impact a poem has on us?  How might narrative structure, word choice, and the presence or absence of a first-person narrator influence our understanding of a novel or a short story?  Representative writers include William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, Jane Austen, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, Gerard Manley Hopkins, T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and Derek Walcott.
Gen Ed; Elective

 

ENG 216               Survey of American Literature                                                                                                       

Whalan, Mark

American literature from 1850 to the present.
Gen Ed; Elective

 

ENG 221               Introduction to the English Major   

Saunders, Benjamin

This is the second in a three-course sequence introducing new and prospective English majors to the discipline of literary studies. Because a sense of history is one of the tools essential for any detailed appreciation of literature, the sequence introduces English and American literature in historical perspective. Our readings include canonical literary figures as well as lesser known authors. Our aim is to acquaint students with the outlines of a traditional literary history, as well as to suggest possible alternative histories. In addition, students are exposed to some of the terminology and theoretical perspectives central to contemporary literary studies. English 220/221/222 is thus not just a survey of English and American literature; it is also a methods course. The second term covers the early modern period, beginning with the Renaissance and ending at the threshold of Romanticism.
Major Requirement

 

ENG 225               The Age of Arthur                                                                                                                                    

Bayless, Martha

Introduction to the literature of the Middle Ages set against the backdrop of medieval culture.
 Gen Ed: Elective

 

ENG 230               Introduction to Environmental Literature  

Wald, Sarah

This class focuses on U.S. literature that explores the relationship between humans and their environments. We start this class with a consideration of the traditional canon of U.S. Nature Writing from Henry David Thoreau to Terry Tempest Williams. We consider the kinds of relationships to nature that such writing promotes. How does such writing define “nature” and the more-than-human world? How are ideas about masculinity, femininity, ability, and sexuality conveyed?  Is Nature Writing an inclusive genre that invites contributions from all people? How do we understand the disproportionate presence of white writers in the genre?  Where is the nature writing by people of color?

The second part of the class responds to these questions by expanding what counts as environmental literature and focusing on environmental literature written by Asian Americans, Native Americans, African Americans, and Latina/os.
Gen Ed; Elective

 

ENG 241               Introduction to African American Literature       (College Scholars)

Thorsson, Courtney

This course is a survey of writings by African American authors from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. Studying fiction, essays, and poetry, we will read representative texts to consider whether there are specific formal and thematic elements that characterize African American literary tradition in the twentieth and twenty-first century. We will consider how these texts fit into or defy ideas about race, gender, and class on the one hand and classifications of genre, period, and literary style on the other. We will study relationships among these works to uncover how they reflect on, depend on, or revise one another. We will look for relationships between these works and other art forms such as music and visual arts. This means that as we read each text closely, we will also listen closely to a relevant speech, poetry reading, or piece of music. The goal of this course is to help you engage with African American literature, improving your writing, reading, and critical thinking skills in the process. This class requires substantial reading and writing and vigorous participation.
Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 

ENG 242               Introduction to Asian American Literature       

Fickle, Tara

This course introduces students to the major authors, political and cultural issues, and historical movements that have influenced Asian American literature and culture. How has this internally diverse group negotiated its relationship to America and defined itself against and through other racial groups, particularly more recent immigrants? How do we understand the “minority” author and her place within American letters? By the end of the course, students will be conversant in the history of Asian immigration and American legislation, the construction of the “model minority” and other twentieth-century stereotypes, and literary tropes that have traditionally been associated with the genre.
Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 

ENG 260               Media Aesthetics   

Gopal, Sangita

This course aims to develop your media literacy by providing you with a precise set of critical tools for analyzing moving image texts.  Although our primary focus will be on the formal analysis of image and sound rather than media history or social issues, we will study the interplay between artistic and social conventions and the role of ideology in shaping the meaning of media texts.  We will view and critique numerous film and television clips, as well as several feature-length films.  Online group projects will enable students to shape course content by choosing media clips that illustrate concepts covered by readings and lectures.  While not oriented toward the technical or industrial aspects of media productions, the course builds skills that are beneficial to both media producers and consumers.
Elective

 

ENG 266               History of the Motion Picture

Ovalle, Priscilla  

This is the second course in a two-term sequence that studies the evolution of cinema as an institution and art form. English 266 continues from the post-war period to the present. The aim of the course is to develop interpretive skills relevant to the study of cinema by examining the history of major movements in Hollywood and world cinema. Such historical developments in cinema have themselves been shaped or influenced by larger social and political events.  This confluence means that, rather than merely looking at some movies, we will be investigating the history of the cinema and the history of the world (or at least a few parts of it) as it is reflected through motion pictures.
Gen Ed; Elective

 

ENG 300               Introduction to Literary Criticism  

Sayre, Gordon

Various techniques and approaches to literary criticism (e.g., historical, feminist, formalist, deconstructionist, Freudian, Marxist, semiotic) and their applications.
Theory

 

ENG 325               Literature of the Northwest  

Witte, John

Survey of significant Pacific Northwest literature as set against the principles of literary regionalism.
1789+

 

ENG 330               Oral Controversy & Advocacy  

Horton, Kathleen

In-depth study of the habits of research, reasoning, selection, and presentation necessary for ethical and effective oral advocacy on contested topics. Not open to freshmen. Prereq: WR 122 or equivalent.
Elective

 

ENG 335               Inventing Arguments   

Frank, David

Analysis and use of patterns of reasoning derived from the disciplines of rhetoric, informal logic, cognitive science, and the theory of argumentation.
Theory

 

ENG 381               Film, Media, and Culture     

Miller, Quinn

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.  It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that promote cultural pluralism and tolerance. It historicizes traditions of representation in film and media and analyzes works of contemporary film and media to explore the impact and evolution of these practices.  Classroom discussion will be organized around course readings, screenings and publicity (interviews, trailers, etc).  Assignments will supplement these discussions by providing opportunities to develop critical /analytical /evaluative dialogues and essays about cinematic representation.  ENG 381 satisfies the Arts and Letters group requirement by actively engaging students in the ways the discipline of film and media studies has been shaped by the study of a broad range of identity categories, including gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and class. By requiring students to analyze and interpret cinematic representation from these perspectives, the course will promote an understanding of film as an art form that exists in relation to its various social contexts. ENG 381 also satisfies the Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance multicultural requirement by enabling students to develop scholarly insight into the construction of collective identities in the mass media forms of film and television. It will study the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on mainstream media. Students will study the ways representational conventions, such as stereotypes, have resulted from filmmaking traditions that have excluded voices from varying social and cultural standpoints. The course will also consider filmmaking practices and modes of reception that promote cultural pluralism and tolerance.
Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 

ENG 391               American Novel     

O’Fallon, Kathleen

In this course, we will examine formal strategies and thematic concerns of 19th century American novels. Using close reading and historical context, we’ll investigate these questions: How do our authors imagine Americanness? What are the possibilities and limits of the novel form and how are they tied to national identity? How do these novels construct race, class, and gender? How do ethnic American and women writers shape this tradition? This course is designed to help you engage in literary study and intellectual conversation. It is thus an opportunity to hone your critical faculty through scholarly discussion and analytical writing about literature.
Gen Ed; 1789+

 

ENG 392               American Novel   

Wonham, Henry

English 392 together with 391 forms a chronological upper-division survey of the American novel from its beginnings in the 19th century to the present. These courses can be taken as a sequence, or they can be taken individually. ENG 391 covers the 19th century, while ENG 392 covers the 20th. No prerequisites are required, but students should be capable of advanced university-level work in literary studies. Although readings focus on a specific period, both courses challenge students to locate American fiction within broadly conceived historical, social, and political contexts. As concentrated surveys of major American fiction, both courses satisfy the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.
Gen Ed; 1789+

 

ENG 395               20th Century Literature  

TBA

English 395 together with 394 forms a chronological upper-division survey of modern literature from America, Britain, and Europe. Both courses incorporate works of prose, poetry, and drama, and both attend closely to philosophical, political, and cultural events that run parallel to developments in 20th century literary history. These courses can be taken as a sequence, or they can be taken individually. ENG 394 covers the period from 1890 through 1945; ENG 395 covers the period from 1945 to the present. No prerequisites are required, but students should be prepared for advanced university-level work in literary studies. Although readings in each course focus on a relatively narrow fifty-year period, both ENG 394 and 395 address issues, movements, and intellectual trends (Freudianism, Marxism, Fascism, Existentialism, for example) that are central to 20th century intellectual history more generally.
Gen Ed; 1789+

 

ENG 407               Seminar: Race, Culture, Incarceration  

Luk, Sharon

In this course, we will examine the reorganization of racial apartheid on the U.S. west coast after 1965 and the role of literature and culture in movements to survive it. Key questions we will investigate include: What is the relationship between “race” and the contemporary mass incarceration system? How has literary production amongst aggrieved communities helped to create alternative social possibilities? What methods of reading and analysis can we use to situate such writing in relevant historical context?

FEW; 1789+

 

ENG 410               Topic: Romanticism of Contemporary  Culture

Pyle, Forest

It is the thesis of this course that Romanticism is not merely a discrete historical period in literary and cultural history but a set of motifs or themes or ideas that remain as vital to certain strains of contemporary culture as they were in early nineteenth-century Britain.  This course has two principal objectives: a careful examination of some defining texts of British Romanticism and a critical reflection on the ways in which some important strains of contemporary culture are continuations or revisitations of what we call Romanticism. In addition to the poems and novels of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Percy and Shelley, Keats, Byron, and Emily Bronte, we will listen to music by such contemporary artists as of Joy Division, Nirvana, The Smiths, Radiohead, Bon Iver, The Velvet Underground, Nick Drake, Cat Power, and Patti Smith and see movies by such filmmakers as Jim Jarmusch, Anton Corbin, Ridley Scott, Todd Haynes, and Wong Kar-Wei.
1789+

               

ENG 410               Topic: Melville’s Moby-Dick  

Wonham, Henry

Although we will read some ancillary works of fiction, biography, and criticism, this seminar will be focus on Herman Melville’s classic novel, Moby Dick. Students who are apt to become sea-sick should not sign on for this voyage.
1789+

 

ENG 410               Irish Lit, 1945 to Present   

Quigley, Mark

This course will follow the development of Irish literature as Ireland emerges from the struggle for independence that defined Irish culture during the early part of the twentieth century and tries to come to grips with the challenges of modern nationhood. We will consider the mixed political and cultural legacies of Irish postcoloniality and the immense challenge of writing in the wake of Yeats and Joyce. Examining how Ireland moves from being a country largely defined at mid-century by the rhythms of a rural agricultural society and the trauma of an almost constant hemorrhage of emigration, we will trace the impacts of an ambitious modernization program and the decades of political violence in Northern Ireland that jolted Irish society from the 1960s to the 1990s. We will then conclude the course by reflecting on Ireland’s surprising (and ultimately very brief) role as one of globalization’s great “success stories” whose sleek, high-tech “Celtic Tiger” society was hailed as a glimpse of an infinitely bright future in the heady days of the early 2000s until dramatically imploding a few years later.
1789+

 

ENG 410               Queer Productions II

Miller, Quinn

This course will build on the work that students do with soap operas and experimental film/video in Queer Productions I during fall term. Topics considered include survival, emphemera, the 1980s, genderqueer feminisms, and genderqueer agitation. We will continue to explore queer productions of the past, focusing on the work of Barbara Hammer, as well as on Symbiopsychotaxiplasm (William Greaves), Trash (Paul Morrissey), Outtakes (Sylvan Oswald), while considering our role in and what it means to make queer culture now and in the future. Students will prepare for, attend, and revisit the queer productions symposium (on archives, soaps, fans, and cultural theory) and several coordinated Wednesday night screenings at the Schnitzer art museum on campus in anticipation of the Zackary Drucker exhibit and panel on trans TV crossover scheduled for spring. There is no prerequisite for this course.
Elective

 

ENG 423               The Age of Beowulf 

Clark, Stephanie

This course explores a broad selection of texts from the three cultures inhabiting the British Isles in the early Middle Ages: the Irish, the Anglo-Saxons, and the Danes. The central text in each unit is an epic, the Táin bo Culainge, the Saga of the Volsungs, and Beowulf, but we will also read founding myths, religious texts, and shorter poetry. Medieval literature can be forbidding – the narrative conventions are often different from modern literature, the culture and language unfamiliar (although everything we are reading is translated). But the literature is also highly rewarding and can train students to notice and understand ways of thinking alien to that of modern society. An added bonus: this course should give you many wonderful ideas for great tattoos.
 Pre-1500

ENG 427               Chaucer   

Laskaya, Anne

Close textual study of selected Canterbury Tales in Middle English; instruction in the grammar and pronunciation of Chaucer’s language.
Pre-1500

 

ENG 429               Old English II: Shorter Works  

Bayless, Martha

Study of Old English prose or poetry in the original language.  Pre or co-req: ENG 428/528
Elective

 

ENG 461               American Literature to 1800    

Sayre, Gordon

This course is an introduction to the literature of colonial America and the Early Republic. It does not emphasize the familiar genres of novel, poetry, and short story. Instead, we will be reading missionary relations, spiritual autobiographies, scientific tracts, and personal narratives of exploration and captivity, as well as two stage dramas. The syllabus is designed around five recent feature films with early American people and settings: Cabeza de Vaca, Black Robe, Pocahontas, Jefferson in Paris, and Amazing Grace. These movies portray the experiences of sixteenth and seventeenth-century explorers and missionaries, and eighteenth-century politicians, and also enable us discuss the political and cultural importance of certain texts and histories for contemporary audiences.
1500-1789                     

 

ENG 469      Literature & Environment: Place-Based Identities      

Wald, Sarah

How does our relationship to place shape our identities? How do contemporary mobility and transnational migration shape our relationship to place? Does a sense of place create environmental awareness? What might it mean to develop a sense of planet? This course considers these questions through an examination of contemporary multi-ethnic U.S. literature and culture.
1789+

 

ENG 479               Major Authors:  James Joyce  

Peppis, Paul

This course studies the challenging and innovative fiction of James Joyce.  The course will focus on most of Joyce’s major fictional works, including Dubliners, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and, especially, Ulysses.  We will closely read these texts, working to identify and analyze Joyce’s major thematic concerns and formal innovations, including his experiments in free indirect discourse, stream of consciousness narration, allusion and intertextuality.  We will locate Joyce’s literary work in the broader social, political, and cultural contexts to which it responds, especially the Irish Home Rule movement, the Irish literary revival, the World War I, the War for Irish Independence, the Irish Civil War, and literary modernism.
1789+

 

ENG 485               Television Studies 

Miller, Quinn

Study of television’s institutional contents and representational practices, including such television genres as serials, news, and reality TV.
Elective

 

ENG 486               New Media & Digital Culture: Games

Fickle, Tara

Chess. Sudoku. World of Warcraft. Battleship. Candy Crush. Basketball. Roulette. These are all things we call games – but what exactly do they have in common? This course introduces students to the fundamentals of games as cultural phenomena. Beginning with a seemingly obvious question which has frustrated generations of scholars and theorists – what is a game? – we will go on to examine games in terms of function, purpose, mechanics, design, and audience. Students will learn how to talk about games and then how to put that knowledge to work in designing their own games. This course satisfies the Department’s Theory requirement and may satisfy an elective requirement for the New Media & Culture Certificate.
Theory


 
WR 320                 Scientific & Technical Writing   

2 Sections

WR 320 emphasizes the content, form, and style of scientific, professional, and technical writing, including reports, proposals, instructions, correspondence, and the use of graphics and documentation. Students will learn the conventions of discourse in these areas and how they result from different kinds of scientific and technical modes of inquiry. Students will apply this awareness to writing in academic as well as vocational contexts. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing Requirement and upper-division standing.
Elective

 

WR 321                 Business Communication  

Upton, Corbett

WR 321 offers practice in writing and analyzing communication common to business, industry, and related professions. Students will develop a critical awareness of the conventions of discourse in these areas and how they result from interpersonal and organizational contexts encountered in these fields. As aspects of such business writing conventions, this course pays close attention to logical development and stylistic and format choices. The knowledge gained is applicable to academic as well as vocational situations. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing Requirement and upper-division standing.
Elective


 

FLR 235                 Folklore & The Supernatural                                                                                                                  

Wojcik, Daniel

Introduces the study of beliefs about the supernatural by examining diverse approaches to the description and analysis of belief traditions and religious cultures. Topics include apparitions, miracles, prophecy, apocalyptic cults, magic, angels, pilgrimage, vampires, UFOs, zombies, possession states, and supernatural assault.
Gen Ed: Elective

 

FLR 350                 The Bible as Folklore                                                                                                                               

Dugaw, Dianne

This course will bring together readings of the Bible in the Judeo-Christian tradition in connection with apt mythological, folkloristic, and traditional contexts, concepts, and meanings. We will read sections of the Bible that have continuing presence in Western culture and literature, exploring how these are shaped by oral traditions and how they carry ongoing symbolic and narrative meaning. In addition to reading key narrative, lyrical, prophetic, and epistolary sections of the King James English bible, we will take a folkloristic approach in studying these accounts—contextualizing them both in relation to modes of oral creation and dissemination, and in connection with parallels to and adaptations of biblical stories in other cultural forms and traditions.
FEW

 

FLR 411        Folklore & Religion                                                                                                                                   

Wojcik, Daniel

Examines the research questions and theoretical models used by folklorists and other scholars in the study of vernacular religion and popular spirituality. We will examine religion and spirituality as it is “lived,” focusing primarily on beliefs and practices that are informally learned and generally unsanctioned by institutional doctrines and authorities. The course is organized to reflect particular topics and areas of research that have preoccupied folklorists, and we will explore the issues and perspectives that have informed their studies. The role of folklore in peoples religious lives will be explored through the analysis of narratives, rituals, beliefs, customs, celebrations, pilgrimages, trance states, and numinous experiences.
FEW

 


 

HUM 240             Medical Humanities                                                                                                                                     

Wood, Mary

This class explores crucial questions about health, well-being, medicine, and social inequality in the twenty-first century. Through a combination of lecture and small-class discussion, as well as online forums, students will examine definitions of health and well-being; the implications of new genetic and reproductive technologies; disparities in global burdens of disease; the relationship among health, illness, and narrative; and gendered and cultural differences in the experiences of illness and the practices of healthcare and medicine.
Elective

 


 

Creative Writing course descriptions can be found at the Creative Writing Class Schedule Listing