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University of Oregon

Summer 2015


ENG 110                Introduction to Film and Media                                                                               TBA
Basic critical approaches to film and media studies. Analysis and interpretation of film and media.
Gen Ed; Elective


ENG 300               Introduction to Literary Criticism                                                                             Upton, Corbett
Various techniques and approaches to literary criticism (e.g., historical, feminist, formalist, deconstructionist, Freudian, Marxist, semiotic) and their applications.
Theory

 

ENG 321                English Novel                                                                                                               O’Fallon, Kathleen
This course covers the rise of the novel from Defoe to Austen.
Gen Ed; 1500-1789


 
ENG 325                Literature of the Northwest                                                                                     Witte, John
Survey of significant Pacific Northwest literature as set against the principles of literary regionalism.
1789+


ENG 381                Film, Media, and Culture                                                                                         Platt, Daniel
This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.  It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that promote cultural pluralism and tolerance. It historicizes traditions of representation in film and media and analyzes works of contemporary film and media to explore the impact and evolution of these practices.  Classroom discussion will be organized around course readings, screenings and publicity (interviews, trailers, etc).  Assignments will supplement these discussions by providing opportunities to develop critical /analytical /evaluative dialogues and essays about cinematic representation.  ENG 381 satisfies the Arts and Letters group requirement by actively engaging students in the ways the discipline of film and media studies has been shaped by the study of a broad range of identity categories, including gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and class. By requiring students to analyze and interpret cinematic representation from these perspectives, the course will promote an understanding of film as an art form that exists in relation to its various social contexts. ENG 381 also satisfies the Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance multicultural requirement by enabling students to develop scholarly insight into the construction of collective identities in the mass media forms of film and television. It will study the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on mainstream media. Students will study the ways representational conventions, such as stereotypes, have resulted from filmmaking traditions that have excluded voices from varying social and cultural standpoints. The course will also consider filmmaking practices and modes of reception that promote cultural pluralism and tolerance.
Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective


ENG 392               American Novel                                                                                                        Vazquez, David
English 392 together with 391 forms a chronological upper-division survey of the American novel from its beginnings in the 19th century to the present. These courses can be taken as a sequence, or they can be taken individually. ENG 391 covers the 19th century, while ENG 392 covers the 20th. No prerequisites are required, but students should be capable of advanced university-level work in literary studies. Although readings focus on a specific period, both courses challenge students to locate American fiction within broadly conceived historical, social, and political contexts. As concentrated surveys of major American fiction, both courses satisfy the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.
Gen Ed; 1789+


ENG 394               20th Century Literature                                                                                                        Bryant-Berg, Kristy
English 394 together with 395 forms a chronological upper-division survey of modern literature from America, Britain, and Europe. Both courses incorporate works of prose, poetry, and drama, and both attend closely to philosophical, political, and cultural events that run parallel to developments in 20th century literary history. These courses can be taken as a sequence, or they can be taken individually. ENG 394 covers the period from 1890 through 1945; ENG 395 covers the period from 1945 to the present. No prerequisites are required, but students should be prepared for advanced university-level work in literary studies. Although readings in each course focus on a relatively narrow fifty-year period, both ENG 394 and 395 address issues, movements, and intellectual trends (Freudianism, Marxism, Fascism, Existentialism, for example) that are central to 20th century intellectual history more generally. As parts of a broad survey of major European, British, and American literature, both courses satisfy the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.
Gen Ed; 1789+

 

ENG 399                 Special Studies: Ken Kesey                                                                                Arnold, David
Intensive study of Kesey and his impact; includes reading from The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Sometimes a Great Notion, Demon Box, Jail Book, and the critics.
1789+
 


 

FLR 411                 Folklore & Religion                                                                                                  Wojcik, Daniel
Explores the role of folklore in people’s religious lives with particular emphasis on narrative, beliefs, rituals, celebrations, pilgrimage, and ecstatic states.
Multicultural; FEW


Creative Writing course descriptions can be found at http://pages.uoregon.edu/crwrweb/courses/.