Skip to Content
University of Oregon

Fall 2014

 

ENG 104               Introduction to Literature: Fiction                                                                                                              6 Sections

Actual reading lists vary significantly depending on the expertise and teaching philosophy of the instructor, but all sections of the course offer students a broad introduction to the study of literary fiction. Whether readings focus on the stories and novels of major writers or on works from a specific period or national tradition, students develop analytical skills that will allow them to think, write, and speak intelligently about fiction. The course addresses basic questions about the nature of prose narrative and the interrelated activities of reading, writing, and interpretation. What is a story, and what role do stories play in our cultural and political lives? Is interpretation of a literary text a purely subjective process, or are some interpretations more valid than others? Narrative technique, point of view, and character development are some of the terms and concepts examined in the course, though each instructor will bring his or her own analytical framework to the class. Weekly readings of short stories and novels are substantial in scope and difficulty, and students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages. As a basic introduction to a major genre in the field of literary studies, this course satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category. It is not recommended for English Majors, who are encouraged to enroll in the department’s more historically oriented and comprehensive Introduction to the English Major sequence, ENG 220-222.

Gen Ed

 

ENG 105               Introduction to Literature: Drama                                                                                                                             TBA

This course is an introduction to drama, one of the major genres in literary studies. Students will read, discuss, and analyze plays from a variety of periods and national traditions in order to become familiar with the major styles, techniques, and conventions that characterize dramatic literature. Although this is a course on drama as literature, with an emphasis on the interpretation and analysis of dramatic texts, students will explore the preformative dimensions of drama as well. The course will provide a broad introduction to theoretical and historical debates that stand at the center literary studies today, and students will have the chance to enter into these debates through critical writing assignments totaling at least 8-10 pages. Readings typically average one play per week, in addition to which students may be expected to attend out-of-class screenings of dramatic performances. As a basic introduction to texts, issues and questions that are central to the study of dramatic literature, this course satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category. It is not recommended for English Majors, who are encouraged to enroll in the department’s more historically oriented and comprehensive Introduction to the English Major sequence, ENG 220-222.

Gen Ed

 

ENG 106               Introduction to Literature: Poetry                                                                                                                 2 sections

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the formal properties of poetry in English. Through careful analysis of poems by major writers, students will be challenged to explain not only what a given poem might mean to its readers, but also how a poem communicates meaning differently than a work of fiction, drama, or some other mode of literary expression. ENG 106 is not a comprehensive introduction to the traditions of English and American poetry; it is, rather, a series of intensive exercises designed to equip students with the analytical tools needed to read, discuss, and write about poetry effectively. Weekly readings are relatively short but extremely demanding, and students will do a substantial amount of critical writing, including formal essays totaling at least 8-10 pages. As a basic introduction a major genre in the field of literary studies, this course satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category. It is not recommended for English Majors, who are encouraged to enroll in the department’s more historically oriented and comprehensive Introduction to the English Major sequence, ENG 220-222.

Gen Ed

ENG 107               World Literature                                                                                                                                   Shankman, Steven        

This is one of three courses that form a three-part chronological survey of international trends in literature from its archaic and classical origins to the present. These courses can be taken as a yearlong sequence, or they can be taken individually. All works are read in English translation. There are no prerequisites, and no background knowledge of international literary history is expected. All three courses seek to give students a truly global sense of literary history by incorporating works in various genres from Asia, the Near East, Africa, Latin America, Europe, North America, and elsewhere. ENG 107 begins with the archaic period and ends with the late Middle Ages in Europe. ENG 108 spans the period from the European Renaissance to the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution, focusing on cultural relations between the Near East and Europe. ENG 109 covers the 19th and 20th centuries, with emphasis on the emergence of global cultural movements such as Romanticism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism. All three courses seek to juxtapose Western and non- Western readings, challenging students to locate “classic” literary works within a global perspective. Weekly readings of short stories and novels are substantial in scope and difficulty, and students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages. With their comparative focus on various literary traditions, all three courses satisfy the University Multicultural Requirement in the International Cultures category. In offering students a broad introduction to college-level literary studies, ENG 107, 108, and 109 also satisfy the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.

Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 

ENG 110               Introduction to Film and Media                                                                                                                                    2 sections

Basic critical approaches to film and media studies. Analysis and interpretation of film and media.

Gen Ed; Elective

 

ENG 199               Freshman Seminar: Villains and Vampires                                                                              Bryant-Berg, Kristy

From Bram Stoker’s Dracula to Stephenie Meyer’s Edward, vampires have evolved from seductive villains to troubled heroes, each embodying fears haunting their historical moment. Develop an appreciation for the roots of the American mystery and horror genres through reading, interpreting, and writing about short stories and pinnacle novels by Edgar Allen Poe, Anne Rice, and more. Explore our culture’s fascination with those dwelling on the boundaries between evil and virtue, and life and death.   Examine your own fears and attraction to mysteries and horror in order to understand the real psychology underlying these fantasies that both attract and repel us.

Elective

 

ENG 199               Freshman Seminar:  American Sports Poetry                                                                                Upton, Corbett

Let the Games Begin!: American Sports Poetry: “I’m gonna float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. / His hands can’t hit what his eyes can’t see.” Engage sports poems and sports history from Frances Seargent Osgood to Muhammad Ali. Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, American poets have turned to popular (and not so popular) sports as subjects and figures to express themes of human achievement, love, struggle and suffering, deep philosophical and spiritual contemplation, and public life. In this course, you will discuss and analyze a wide range of American poetry and the role of sports in public and private life, talk with guest speakers, attend sporting events, compose original work, and learn about the resources available on campus to conduct your own research about sports poetry.

Elective

 

ENG 200               Public Speaking as a Liberal Art                                                                                                       Horton, Kathleen

Study and practice of public speaking as grounded in the five rhetorical canons of invention, arrangement, style, delivery and memory.

Elective

 

ENG 207               Shakespeare                                                                                                                                                           2 sections

Students read, discuss, and critique Shakespeare’s early comedies and tragedies. Plays covered generally include (but are not limited to) A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV (Part One), Richard II, Henry V, Julius Caesar, and Hamlet. Weekly readings and occasional screenings of plays demand a considerable investment of time and effort, in addition to which students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages.   The course introduces students to central questions in the study of dramatic art, as well as to issues pertaining more broadly to the study of literature in English. Students will leave the course having read extensively from the works of one of the major writers of the western tradition, and they will have acquired interpretive, analytical, and communication skills that will aid them in their future coursework in English and other disciplines. ENG 207 satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.

Gen Ed; Shakespeare

 

ENG 208               Shakespeare                                                                                                                                                          3 sections

Students read, discuss, and critique Shakespeare’s later comedies and tragedies. Plays covered in ENG 208 generally include (but are not limited to) Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth, Anthony and Cleopatra, The Tempest, and Othello. Weekly readings and occasional screenings of plays demand a considerable investment of time and effort, in addition to which students will be asked to compose critical essays of varying length, totaling at least 8-10 pages. The course introduces students to central questions in the study of dramatic art, as well as to issues pertaining more broadly to the study of literature in English. Students will leave the course having read extensively from the works of one

of the major writers of the western tradition, and they will have acquired interpretive, analytical, and communication skills that will aid them in their future coursework in English and other disciplines. ENG 208 satisfies the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.

Gen Ed; Shakespeare

 

ENG 220               Introduction to the English Major                                                                                                         Laskaya, Anne

This course provides students with an overview of English literature from the Early, High and late Middle Ages through the first decades of the Early Modern period.  It is designed to give students some understanding of key themes, issues, aesthetic features, and literary developments that texts from these historical periods illustrate. The course will explore the reciprocal dynamic between history and text as well as illuminate the literary features common in vernacular texts of the Middle Ages and Early modern period. Readings include works such as Beowulf, The Bayeux Tapestry, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, short selections from the Canterbury Tales, and Thomas More’s Utopia.

Assessment includes: Quizzes in discussion sections, midterm, two formal papers (each revised after feedback), and a final exam.

Major Requirement

 

ENG 225               The Age of Arthur                                                                                                                                         Laskaya, Anne

This course provides students an exposure to English and French literature important for the English literary tradition in translation from the very Early to Late Middle Ages.  The course will include Arthurian quest narratives, medieval historical accounts of Arthur, and late medieval versions of the Arthurian material, but will also look at some examples of typical medieval literature concerned with the world and its challenges from 800 to 1500. It will not typically include texts covered in other English courses focused on medieval literature.  Readings may include: Arthurian stories in fiction and in historical chronicles, medieval dream visions, poetry and drama, as well as some attention to medieval visual art and artifacts that connect to the world of early, high, and late medieval English literature.   Requirements include: attendance, participation, quizzes, 2 papers, a group presentation project, final exam.

Elective

ENG 241               Intro to African American Literature                                                                                                         Luk, Sharon

African American literature and culture in relevant intellectual social and historical contexts.

                               

ENG 242               Introduction to Asian American Literature                                                                                             Luk, Sharon

Asian American literature and culture in relevant intellectual social and historical contexts.

Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 

ENG 243               Introduction to Chicano/Latino Literature                                                                                     Vazquez, David

Latina/os have lived and worked in what is now the United States since before the founding of the country. During our time here, Chicana/os and Latina/os have produced a number of literary texts and critical works designed to document our experiences as radicalized subjects. In this course we will read a variety of literary and critical texts that seek to answer the following questions: Who are Chicana/os (Mexican Americans)? What does it mean to be a Latina/o in the United States? What are the differences between Chicana/os and Latina/os? What are the similarities? What historical trajectories shape(d) our lives? How do Chicana/os and Latina/os continue to evolve and change as groups in the U.S.?

Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 

ENG 244               Introduction to Native American Literature                                                                                       Brown, Kirby

This introductory course in Native American literature surveys a wide array of native writing across genres, regions, periods, and nations. In addition to gaining a better understanding of and appreciation for the diversity and complexity of Native American intellectual production, you will also leave the course with a historically nuanced grasp of some of the major issues, questions, and concerns that run throughout the writing of Native America.
Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 

ENG 245               Ethnic American Literature: Introduction to 21st-Century Ethnic American Literature   Vazquez, David

Both thematically and formally, ethnic American novels have undergone a radical shift during the past two decades. Indeed, many authors have broken the ties between realist, linear novels and older social protest traditions. Instead, we see an increasing attention to narrative experimentation, especially in forms that facilitate the author’s “imagining” of alternative social realities. In this course we will read a series of novels by Asian American, Native American, African American, and Latina/o authors in order to understand how their novels challenge the form of the novel, imagine new social realities, and trouble social protest traditions.

Multicultural

 

ENG 260               Media Aesthetics                                                                                                                                      2 sections

This course aims to develop media literacy by providing students with a precise set of critical tools for analyzing photographic, cinematic and televisual texts.   Although its primary focus is on the formal analysis of image and sound rather than media history or social issues, the course considers the interplay between artistic and social conventions and the role of ideology in shaping the meaning of media texts. We view and critique numerous film and television clips, as well as several feature-length films.  Student presentations enable the class to shape course content by choosing media clips that illustrate concepts covered by readings and lectures.  While not oriented toward the technical or industrial aspects of media production, the course builds skills that are beneficial to both media producers and consumers.  Requirements include weekly writing assignments, a group presentation, an extensive sequence analysis, and two exams.

Elective

 

ENG 265                History of the Motion Picture                                                                                                        Aronson, Michael

This course together with 266 & 267 forms a chronological survey of the evolution of cinema as an institution and an art form. The courses can be taken individually or as parts of an integrated sequence. ENG 265 moves from the origins of cinema in the late 19th century through World War II.  The primary texts for the course are the films themselves, but supplementary readings will also be assigned. Students will submit a media journal and a term paper, and there will be two exams. The aim of each course is to develop interpretive skills relevant to the study of film by examining the history of major movements in Hollywood and world cinema. As a broad introduction to interpretive, theoretical, and institutional issues that are central to the study of film, both courses satisfy the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.

Gen Ed; Elective

 

ENG 280               Introduction to Comic Studies                                                                                                  Saunders, Benjamin

This class is conceived as an introduction to the art of comics, and to the methodologies of the new academic discipline of Comics Studies. Course content will vary from term to term, according to the specialist interests of the individual instructor, within the following parameters. Students will be exposed to a spectrum of comic-art forms (i.e., at a minimum, three of the following archetypal forms: the gag cartoon, the editorial cartoon, the newspaper strip, the comic book, the graphic novel, the web comic.) Students will be exposed to a historical range of comic texts, ranging from (at least) the early 1900s to the present. Students will be required to read several professional critical or theoretical essays over the course of the term alongside the primary materials the instructor of record assigns.  These essays will be drawn relevant academic peer-reviewed sources.  Scott McCloud’s influential book, Understanding Comics, will be required reading for all versions of the class.

Elective

 

ENG 316               Women Writer Forms: African American Women’s Novels                                         Thorsson, Courtney

In this course, we will examine formal strategies and thematic concerns of African American women’s novels from the 19th century to the present. Using close reading and historical context, we will consider how these novels construct race, class, and gender; the possibilities and limits of the novel form; whether and how these texts engage with Black Nationalism, Civil Rights, Black Power, Black Arts, Feminism, and other political movements; how these novels envision home, community, and nation; and, finally, whether these novels are part of a distinct tradition of African American women’s writing and, if so, what formal and thematic traits characterize that tradition. The goal of this course is to help you engage with African American literature, improving your writing, reading, and critical thinking skills in the process. This class requires substantial reading and writing and vigorous participation.

Multicultural; FEW, 1789+

 

ENG 321               English Novel                                                                                                                                          O’Fallon, Kathleen

Rise of the novel from Defoe to Austen.

Gen Ed; 1500-1789

 

ENG 322               English Novel                                                                                                                                               TBA

Rise of the novel from Scott to Hardy.

Gen Ed; 1789+

 

ENG 323               English Novel                                                                                                                                               TBA

The rise of the novel from Conrad to the present.

Gen Ed; 1789+

 

ENG 335               Inventing Arguments                                                                                                                          Crosswhite, James

Analysis and use of patterns of reasoning derived from the disciplines of rhetoric, informal logic, cognitive science, and the theory of argumentation. Prereq: WR 122 or equivalent.

Gen Ed; Theory

 

ENG 340               Jewish Writers                                                                                                                                           Kaufman, Heidi

In recent years Jewish fiction and non-fiction writers have embraced the quest memoir to explore family secrets, unknown histories, and lost or misunderstood family stories. These narratives are not only interested in recovering history, but in charting the experience of recovering history. One of the defining features of these texts is the obsession with material fragments—archives, bunches of letters, photographs, old train tickets, diaries, and/or misplaced objects from another world.  As the writers of these narratives search for “the truth” (which they never find completely) they wrestle with relationships among memory, narrative, and the meaning of Jewish identity.  This course will study a selection of Jewish memoir quests from around the world to understand how the memoir form and the objects/papers of memory work rhetorically and aesthetically; how the past appears through the lens of memoir; and why the materials of memory—paper and objects—seem to carry or unleash so much narrative and emotional power in contemporary Jewish writing. Gen Ed; Multicultural; 1789+, FEW

 

ENG 380               Film, Media, and History                                                                                                                   Aronson, Michael

ENG 380 looks at the history of the American film and media industry not just as the sum of its products (i.e., films designed for mass consumption), but also as a complex cultural, economic and aesthetic system that produced complex cultural products. Although literature, for example, also consists of products (of various publishers, authors who write for a living, etc.), it is not an industrial art form on the scale that motion pictures are. From early in its history, Hollywood dominated, and continues to dominate, the world in a way in which no other cultural producer has dominated an industry or art form. This course is about the Hollywood film and its relationship with the American film industry, and about the ways in which Hollywood has historically responded to challenges, whether global, social, cultural or technological. In order to more fully understand the relationship between Hollywood, American culture and its films, this course will emphasize viewing, discussion and analysis. ENG 380 satisfies the Arts and Letters group requirement by actively engaging students in the ways the discipline of film and media studies has been defined by historical inquiry. By examining specific works of American film and media within the historical context of their original production and reception over time, the course will enable students to engage with major issues within the field, including star studies, technology, and censorship.

Gen Ed; Elective

 

ENG 381               Film, Media and Culture                                                                                                                           Gopal, Sangita

This course studies works of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.  It considers both the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on media and filmmaking practices and modes of reception that promote cultural pluralism and tolerance. It historicizes traditions of representation in film and media and analyzes works of contemporary film and media to explore the impact and evolution of these practices.  Classroom discussion will be organized around course readings, screenings and publicity (interviews, trailers, etc).  Assignments will supplement these discussions by providing opportunities to develop critical /analytical /evaluative dialogues and essays about cinematic representation.  ENG 381 satisfies the Arts and Letters group requirement by actively engaging students in the ways the discipline of film and media studies has been shaped by the study of a broad range of identity categories, including gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and class. By requiring students to analyze and interpret cinematic representation from these perspectives, the course will promote an understanding of film as an art form that exists in relation to its various social contexts. ENG 381 also satisfies the Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance multicultural requirement by enabling students to develop scholarly insight into the construction of collective identities in the mass media forms of film and television. It will study the effects of prejudice, intolerance and discrimination on mainstream media. Students will study the ways representational conventions, such as stereotypes, have resulted from filmmaking traditions that have excluded voices from varying social and cultural standpoints. The course will also consider filmmaking practices and modes of reception that promote cultural pluralism and tolerance.

Gen Ed; Multicultural; Elective

 

ENG 385               Graphic Narratives & Cultural Theory: Graphic Novels                                                                          2 sections

Graphic novels are literary narratives in comic book form. In 1992, Art Spiegelman won a Pulitzer Prize for his Holocaust narrative Maus and demonstrated that a comic book could also be an important work of literature. Since then, authors have increasingly turned to the graphic novel, especially for exploring family history, global politics, and cultural identity. This course is a survey of 20th and 21st century graphic novels, grounded in cultural theory, ethnic and gender diversity, and political context. The last section centers on graphic novels about Middle East politics from a wide variety of perspectives. Graphic novels include Maus, Flaming Iguanas, Incognegro, Fun Home, New Orleans A.D., Persepolis, and Palestine. Cultural theorists include Benedict Anderson, Georg Simmel, Louis Althusser, Chela Sandoval, and Edward Said.

Gen Ed; Theory

 

ENG 391               American Novel                                                                                                                                       Wonham, Henry

In this course, we will examine formal strategies and thematic concerns of 19th century American novels. Using close reading and historical context, we’ll investigate these questions: How do our authors imagine Americanness? What are the possibilities and limits of the novel form and how are they tied to national identity? How do these novels construct race, class, and gender? How do ethnic American and women writers shape this tradition? This course is designed to help you engage in literary study and intellectual conversation. It is thus an opportunity to hone your critical faculty through scholarly discussion and analytical writing about literature.

Gen Ed; 1789+

 

ENG 392               American Novel                                                                                                                                                                  TBA

English 392 together with 391 forms a chronological upper-division survey of the American novel from its beginnings in the 19th century to the present. These courses can be taken as a sequence, or they can be taken individually. ENG 391 covers the 19th century, while ENG 392 covers the 20th. No prerequisites are required, but students should be capable of advanced university-level work in literary studies. Although readings focus on a specific period, both courses challenge students to locate American fiction within broadly conceived historical, social, and political contexts. As concentrated surveys of major American fiction, both courses satisfy the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.

Gen Ed; 1789+

 

ENG 394               20th Century Literature                                                                                                                                               Wood, Mary

English 395 together with 394 forms a chronological upper-division survey of modern literature from America, Britain, and Europe. Both courses incorporate works of prose, poetry, and drama, and both attend closely to philosophical, political, and cultural events that run parallel to developments in 20th century literary history. These courses can be taken as a sequence, or they can be taken individually. ENG 394 covers the period from 1890 through 1945; ENG 395 covers the period from 1945 to the present. No prerequisites are required, but students should be prepared for advanced university-level work in literary studies. Although readings in each course focus on a relatively narrow fifty-year period, both ENG 394 and 395 address issues, movements, and intellectual trends (Freudianism, Marxism, Fascism, Existentialism, for example) that are central to 20th century intellectual history more generally. As parts of a broad survey of major European, British, and American literature, both courses satisfy the university’s Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category.

Gen Ed; 1789+

 

ENG 395               20th Century Literature                                                                                                                                                             TBA

English 395 together with 394 forms a chronological upper-division survey of modern literature from America, Britain, and Europe. Both courses incorporate works of prose, poetry, and drama, and both attend closely to philosophical, political, and cultural events that run parallel to developments in 20th century literary history. These courses can be taken as a sequence, or they can be taken individually. ENG 394 covers the period from 1890 through 1945; ENG 395 covers the period from 1945 to the present. No prerequisites are required, but students should be prepared for advanced university-level work in literary studies. Although readings in each course focus on a relatively narrow fifty-year period, both ENG 394 and 395 address issues, movements, and intellectual trends (Freudianism, Marxism, Fascism, Existentialism, for example) that are central to 20th century intellectual history more generally.

Gen Ed; 1789+

 

 

 

 

ENG 407               Seminar: Robert Frost (St. Louis Seminar in Poetry)                                                                       Gage, John

The St. Louis Seminars are research-intensive courses that offer junior and senior English Majors opportunities to work closely with faculty members, study compelling literary topics intensively, and pursue advanced research and writing projects.  In this course we will read and discuss Robert Frost’s poetry in relation to his poetic theories as expressed in a number of prose writings.  Background reading will include authors from whom Frost derived inspiration, including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Edwin Arlington Robinson, William James, and modernist poets.  Students will produce a seminar paper in several stages.

 

 

ENG 410               Literature of the State                                                                                                               Whalan, Mark

This course examines a variety of texts that engage the modern state–its functions and possibilities; its ability to repress and coerce; its ability to forge new and enduring kinds of social connection; and what place, if any, it allows for literary culture. It will examine some of the ways in which literature and the state engage with one another—the tradition of utopian and dystopian literature; how the state surveilled and monitored radical writing in the twentieth century; how writers wrote about war, healthcare, and even the federal mail; what relationship a liberal education might have to citizenship; and how literature offers modes of resistance to state policies of racial inequality. We will also consider theoretical models which have mapped the relationship between culture and the state. The course includes texts by Kazuo Ishiguro, J.M. Coetzee, Claude McKay, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Wilfred Owen, and Mary Borden.

 

 

ENG 410               Popular Modernism                                                                                                                                       Peppis, Paul

This course participates in the current reassessment of relations between aesthetic modernism and popular culture.  The rise of “New Modernist studies” over the past 20 years, with its expansive historical orientation and interest in modernism’s original cultural contexts, has led to a serious re-examination of the nature and extent of modernism’s relations with and responses to the popular. Questioning both new critical views of modernism as a mode of elitist formal experimentation detached from and superior to the crass productions of popular culture, and postmodern views of modernism as a mode of neurotic fear and disgust in response to the feminized and feminizing productions of popular culture, this course studies works of pop culture produced during the modernist moment of the early twentieth century that innovate upon the popular genre conventions they also employ.  Texts may include science fiction by HG Wells or Aldous Huxley, detective fiction by Dashiell Hammett or Raymond Chandler, comic strips by Winsor McCay or George Herriman, comic fiction by P. G. Wodehouse or Anita Loos, popular poetry by Edna St. Vincent Millay or Dorothy Parker, and comedy films by Buster Keaton or the Marx Brothers.  Short paper, annotated bibliography, and research paper.

 

 

ENG 419               Contemporary Literary Theory                                                                                                                  Pyle, Forrest

Theory

 

ENG 420               The Art of Sentence                                                                                                             Bergquist, Carolyn

We will study sentences very closely to see how they work, how the individual parts of speech draw together into syntax, and what effect (artistic and otherwise) these patterns of syntax create. We will explore sentence structures with diagramming, to develop a clear sense of sentence structure, and reflecting upon the artful potential of those sentence elements. In individual projects, pooling observations and ideas in Blackboard discussion, and in-class discussions, we will develop a critical language based in grammar for describing style. Students will study their own sentences and academic writing style in order to gain more artistic and technical control. Throughout, we will reflect on the process of learning and engaging with sentences at this level of detail. Graduate students will complete additional readings and a substantial style project. We may also, perhaps, enjoy the possibilities of English and have some fun with words.

Elective

 

ENG 428               Old English I                                                                                                                                                Bayless, Martha

Introduction to the Old English language.

Pre-1500

 

ENG 438               Shakespeare’s Rivals                                                                                                                                  Rowe, George

An in-depth examination of plays written by Shakespeare’s contemporaries, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, and John Webster, among them.

1500-1789

 

ENG 451               19th Century Studies: Victorian London Lit                                                                                      Kaufman, Heidi

The city of London experienced profound cultural, geographical, and social change throughout the Victorian period (1837-1901). This was an era that witnessed the building of a railroad system, the invention of gas lighting, the development of a public sewage system, a proliferation of poverty and prostitution, and the rise in criminal activity and the police force.  It was also a period when fiction writers turned their gaze on the drama of the urban sphere in the midst of this massive transformation. This course will focus on a complicated and popular depiction of the London streets—Charles Dickens’s last complete novel, Our Mutual Friend, published in monthly parts from May 1864—November 1865.  As we work our way through this rich text, we’ll focus on depictions of the novel’s geographical organization of the city—from the street level to the rooftops of houses; from the wealthy suburbs to the dockside slums; and from the Thames river’s path above the city of London to its watery depths below.  Our study will focus on some of the major cultural and social events that shape Our Mutual Friend, including poverty, disease, crime, racial and class differences, and money.  We will also, however, consider the unique properties of the novel’s form, as a serialized, illustrated, multi-plot novel, in shaping depictions of London geographies amidst this nexus of social concerns. In addition to Our Mutual Friend readings in this course will include additional Victorian writing as well as contemporary scholarship on Victorian London.

1789+

 

 ENG 479              Major Authors: Edit Wharton & Henry James                                                                              Wonham, Henry

Students in ENG 479 will read and discuss selected major works by Edith Wharton and Henry James.  Readings will include Wharton’s The House of Mirth and James’s The Portrait of a Lady, in addition to other works.  Each student will write a critical essay of significant length and scope.

1789+

 

ENG 488               Race and Representation in Film: Race, Sex and Stardom                                                         Ovalle, Priscilla

Stars—They’re Just Like Us! But what is a Hollywood “star”? How do popular notions of race, gender, and sexuality in the United States impact a performer’s “star power” in mainstream media? In this course, you will focus on a few case studies—such as Rita Hayworth or Eddie Murphy—to formally, culturally, and historically analyze stars in popular U.S. culture.

Elective

 

ENG 492               History of Rhetoric and Composition                                                                                           Crosswhite, James

Rhetoric has been characterized as a leading of the soul, as the universal form of communication, as the art of persuasion, as the way we reason and deliberate with one another in conditions of uncertainty, as the discourse of democracy, as the ability to find and create arguments, as the art of style, as the study of how literature affects readers, and as the metaphorical work of language. Rhetoric has also been understood, in its educational role, as a project of developing the essential communicative capabilities of human beings. For over two millennia, rhetoric played a central role in the liberal arts. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, it has begun to reclaim that role.

In this course, we will explore the history of the different ways rhetoric has been understood, with a focus on the way rhetoric has articulated goals for education and human development—especially in the way it has described essential rhetorical capabilities and the best ways of cultivating and strengthening them.

Readings will range from Plato and Aristotle all the way to contemporary cognitive science and composition studies. Students will have the option of writing two shorter papers or one longer paper.

Theory

 

 

 

WR 312                 Principles of Tutoring Writing                                                                                                          Horton, Kathleen

The practice and ethics of tutoring writing in the context of writing in various academic disciplines.  Theories of teaching, tutoring techniques and assessment of writing.

Elective

 

WR 320                 Scientific & Technical Writing                                                                                                                       2 sections

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional and technical writing: weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries.  Use of documentation in publication.  Junior standing required.  Prereq: completion of UO writing requirement.

Elective

 

WR 321                 Scientific and Technical Writing                                                                                                         Upton, Corbett

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business and management students.

Elective

 

 

FLR 250       Introduction to Folklore                                                                                                                      Wojcik, Daniel

This course introduces students to the research questions, theoretical orientations, and fieldwork methods used to study folklore, and therefore satisfies the Arts and Letters group requirements. Students will examine concepts that are central to folkloristic inquiry, survey the social groups and folklore genres that have preoccupied folklorists, investigate the meanings and functions of folklore, and explore relationships between folklore and social issues. The course provides an overview of research methods and theories of culture, and explores topics such as narrative, genre, identity, gender, race, and ethnicity as these apply to everyday life, and the meanings of cultural heritage and expression in cross-cultural perspectives. Students will develop critical thinking and research skills, as well as their abilities to communicate orally and in writing, and will be given the tools and opportunity to document and analyze folkloric expression through interviews, fieldwork, and a research paper.

Gen Ed, Multicultural; Elective

 

 

 

 

 

FLR 320       Car Cultures                                                                                                                                                 Sayre, Gordon

In this course we will learn about the history of the automotive industry and U.S. public policy toward the industry, examine some of the many environmental issues surrounding cars, and study car design and customizing as vernacular art traditions.

FEW