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Posts under tag: Cultural Studies

April 18, 2017

Economy, Emotion, and Ethics in Chinese Cinema: Globalization on Speed

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Author:  David Li

The First and Second Comings of capitalism are conceptual shorthands used to capture the radical changes in global geopolitics from the Opium War to the end of the Cold War and beyond. Centering the role of capitalism in the Chinese everyday, the framework can be employed to comprehend contemporary Chinese culture in general and, as in this study, Chinese cinema in particular.

This book investigates major Chinese-language films from mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in order to unpack a hyper-compressed capitalist modernity with distinctive Chinese characteristics. As a dialogue between the film genre as a mediation of microscopic social life, and the narrative of economic development as a macroscopic political abstraction, it engages the two otherwise remotely related worlds, illustrating how the State and the Subject are reconstituted cinematically in late capitalism. A deeply cultural, determinedly historical, and deliberately interdisciplinary study, it approaches “culture” anthropologically, as a way of life emanating from the every day, and aesthetically, as imaginative forms and creative expressions.

April 12, 2017

Imagining the Nation: Asian American Literature and Cultural Consent

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Author:  David Li

This book seeks to identify the forces behind the emergence of Asian American literature and to explore both the unique place of Asian Americans in American culture and what that place says about the way Americanness is defined. David Li focuses on how the sense of the nation is disseminated through the practice of reading and writing, and he argues that Asian American literature is a productive discursive negotiation of the contemporary contradiction in American citizenship. By analyzing the textual strategies with which literary Asian America is represented, the book shows how the “fictive ethnicity” of the nation continues to exert its regulatory power and suggests how we can work toward a radical American democratic consent.

Imagining the Nation integrates a fine appreciation of the formal features of Asian American literature with the conflict and convergence among different reading communities and the dilemma of ethnic intellectuals caught in the process of their institutionalization. By articulating Asian American structures of feeling across the nexus of East and West, black and white, nation and diaspora, the book both sets out a new terrain for Asian American literary culture and significantly strengthens the multiculturalist challenge to the American canon.

April 23, 2012

Other Others: Levinas, Literature, Transcultural Studies

Author:  Steven Shankman

Steven Shankman’s book Other Others: Levinas, Literature, Transcultural Studies looks at literary works from outside the Judeo-Christian tradition to test Levinas’s notion of “the Other.”

Global Bollywood

Author:  Sangita Gopal

Sangita Gopal’s Global Bollywood is an interdisciplinary collection describing the many roots and routs of the Bollywood song-and-dance spectacle. The essays offer a stimulating redefinition of globalization.

Early China/Ancient Greece

Editors:  Steven Shankman & Stephen Durrant

Steven Shankman’s book, Early China/Ancient Greece, co-edited with Stephen Durrant published by State University of New York Press, 2002, compares Chinese and Western thought and offers a bracing and unpredictable cross-cultural conversation.