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Posts under tag: African American Literary Studies

October 1, 2013

Women’s Work and Black Cultural Nationalism: Professor Courtney Thorsson discusses her new book on the WURD

Professor Courtney Thorsson discusses her new book, Women’s Work: Nationalism and Contemporary African American Women’s Novels, with Philadelphia’s 900 am WURD. In her book, Thorsson reconsiders the gender, genre, and geography of African American nationalism as she explores the aesthetic history of African American writing by women. (more…)

Women’s Work: Nationalism and Contemporary African American Women’s Novels

Thorsson Women's Work

Author:  Courtney Thorsson

In Women’s Work, Courtney Thorsson reconsiders the gender, genre, and geography of African American nationalism as she explores the aesthetic history of African American writing by women. Building on and departing from the Black Arts Movement, the literary fiction of such writers as Toni Cade Bambara, Paule Marshall, Gloria Naylor, Ntozake Shange, and Toni Morrison employs a cultural nationalism—practiced by their characters as “women’s work”—that defines a distinct contemporary literary movement, demanding attention to the continued relevance of nation in post–Black Arts writing. Identifying five forms of women’s work as organizing, dancing, mapping, cooking, and inscribing, Thorsson shows how these writers reclaimed and revised cultural nationalism to hail African America.

June 7, 2012

The Letters of Jean Toomer

Author: Mark Whalan

Jean Toomer was a major figure of the Harlem Renaissance and in the  twentieth-century modernist movement, and this represents the first-ever  annotated collection of his correspondence. The letters included in the  volume were written in the five years surrounding Toomer’s publication  of his seminal work, Cane, and lend unique insight into the life,  aesthetics, politics, and work of a central figure in American  literature of the early twentieth century. (more…)

The Great War and the Culture of the New Negro

Author: Mark Whalan

This is the first book to explore the wide-ranging significance of World War One to the culture of the Harlem Renaissance. Reading authors such as Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Alain Locke, James Weldon Johnson, and W.E.B. Du Bois, the book argues that the war served as a crucial event conditioning African American cultural understandings of masculinity, memory, and nationality in the 1920s and after.