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DugawCDcvr

Dangerous Examples–Fighting & Sailing Women

Recorded by Dianne Dugaw

Dangerous Examples–Fighting & Sailing Women in Song (cdbaby.com/dugaw) is a recording of 10 traditional Anglo-American ballads popular from Elizabethan times to the modern era, that celebrate the Female Warrior heroine, a woman who dresses as a man and goes to war or to sea for love and for glory.

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“Deep Play” John Gay and the Invention of Modernity

Author:  Dianne Dugaw

Dianne Dugaw’s “Deep Play” John Gay and the Invention of Modernity shows that Gay’s satiric preoccupations disclose the key intellectual, ethical, aesthetic, and sociopolitical underpinnings of the modern era.

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Deep Rhetoric

Author: James Crosswhite
 

In Deep Rhetoric (University of Chicago Press, 2013) James Crosswhite shows that a more serious approach to rhetoric and its tradition can provide a vital new understanding of the capabilities that are essential for living and working and participating in roughly free and democratic societies. His book explains not only the philosophical seriousness of rhetoric, but also rhetoric’s potential for guiding and conducting conflicts, achieving justice, and understanding the human condition—as well as its power to generate the goals and processes of a liberal arts education.

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Desiring Donne

Author:  Ben Saunders

In Desiring Donne, published by Harvard University Press, Ben Saunders explores the critical problem of interpretive desire through the figure of John Donne and some of his most passionate readers.

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Documenting Ourselves – Chinese Translation

Author:  Sharon Sherman

Sharon Sherman’s Documenting Ourselves, translated by Juwen Zhang for Central China Normal University (2011), is a readily accessible edition for Chinese scholars who wish to use film as a tool for documenting cultural heritage.

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Documenting Ourselves: Film, Video, and Culture

Author:  Sharon Sherman

In Documenting Ourselves: Film, Video, and Culture, Sharon R. Sherman argues that advances in video technology have made the camcorder an essential tool that has already reshaped the ethnographic process and has the potential to redefine the nature of the documentary itself.

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Early China/Ancient Greece

Editors:  Steven Shankman & Stephen Durrant

Steven Shankman’s book, Early China/Ancient Greece, co-edited with Stephen Durrant published by State University of New York Press, 2002, compares Chinese and Western thought and offers a bracing and unpredictable cross-cultural conversation.

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Emerson and Thoreau: Figures of Friendship

Editors:  John Lysaker & William Rossi
Emerson and Thoreau: Figures of Friendship, edited by John Lysaker and William Rossi, explores the theme of friendship and how the two men conceived of friendship as the creation of shared meaning in light of personal differences, tragedy and loss, and changing life circumstances.

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The End of the World As We Know It

Author:  Daniel Wojcik
Daniel Wojcik’s book, The End of the World As We Know It (New York University Press) analyzes the enduring appeal of apocalyptic and millennialist traditions in American culture.

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Epic and Other Higher Narratives

Author:  Steven Shankman

Steven Shankman’s edited volume explores Eric Auberbach’s Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature (1946) which is one of the most influential and foundational books in the field of comparative literature. Auerbach wrote Mimesis in Istanbul, just on the Asian side of the famous divide between the European and Asian continents, but his book is focused exclusively on the European side of the Bosphorus. He says nothing of Asia. Our volume asks if Auberbach’s approach to the history of literary style and representation is adaptable to — or suggestive for — a more global understanding of higher narrative, i.e. narrative that achieves the kind of elevation, comprehensiveness, and seriousness of purpose that was traditionally associated with the elevated style in Western antiquity.

 

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